Exhibition of Photography & Painting

Control Tower Gallery

Come and see my photography exhibition at the Control Tower Gallery, 29 Liberty Square, Kings Hill ME19 4AU. Let me know if you would like to attend the private view.

Open 9-5 Monday to Friday until 18 September. Featuring @colleen.slater @janelcampling @cathyreadart @diccondadey @kate_scott_paintings @stella.tripp #madeleineHarrington

 

 

 

 

Camouflage in the Ocean – Ambush Predators

The Ambush Predators

Frogfish

ambush predators

Painted frogfish – Antennarius pictus, Padre Burgos, The Philippines

This Painted Frogfish has attached itself to the reef and is very hard to see. Frogfish disguise themselves with an array of spots, warts, stripes and other skin anomalies that allow them to impersonate surrounding rocks or plants. Try finding the eye! They keep very still waiting for prey which it attracts with a thin translucent lure. The spots on this one make it look rather like a sponge with holes over its surface and the black colouration indicates it may be a juvenile. It will eventually grow up to 21cm.

Lizardfish

ambush predators

Variegated Lizardfish, Synodus variegatus, Synodontidae- Sogod Bay, Paloan Island, The Philippines

ambush predator

ambush predator

Missile-shaped Lizardfish are voracious predators with razor-sharp interlocking teeth with which to grasp prey. Their pattern and colouration, which they can change to match their surroundings, make them almost invisible. They are lie-in-wait predators, found on the seafloor or on rocks in relatively shallow water. Remaining absolutely still, with pectoral fins splayed out to the side and head tilted upwards, they scan the water. From this position they spot unwary prey and launch lightning fast strikes. They are common but so well disguised, they often go unnoticed.

Scorpionfish

ambush predator

Scorpionfish – Scorpaenidae – Sogod Bay, Paloan Island, The Philippines

ambush predators

Devil Scorpionfish

ambush predator

The Scorpionfish family is a large one with hundreds of species found over a wide area but mainly found in the Indo-Pacific. It includes some of the most venomous fish in the world. They are bottom-dwelling carnivorous ambush predators, inhabiting reef slopes from 1 to 35 metres and feeding on small fish and crustaceans. Like Frogfish, they are perfectly camouflaged and stay motionless, waiting until prey comes within striking distance.  The strike is faster than the human eye can see. Their venom, which is in the mucus that coats their sharp dorsal spines, is only used defensively.

It can reach a maximum length of 36 cm (14 in), live from 5 to 10 years and can vary considerably in colour. Adults are bearded with a number of tassels below the jaw.

Their near perfect camouflage and the venomous spines make them a hazard for snorkellers and divers in shallow water. 

Crocodilefish

ambush predator

Crocodile Flathead, Cymbacephalus beauforti Scorpaenidae

This is a very odd fish that gets it name from its crocodile like appearance though it only grows to about 50cm (20”) in length. It is a member of the Scorpaenidae order which makes it a close relative to the other ambush predators, the Stonefish and Scorpionfish. Crocodilefish are green or grey in colour with blotches that help them look nearly invisible on the ocean floor. These strange creatures are often found on the muddy bottom in the Western Pacific in places like Indonesia, the Philippines and around the Great Barrier Reef. 

Stargazer

ambush predator

Stargazer – Uranoscopidae – Padre Burgos, The Philippines

Stargazers are a family, of perciform fish that have eyes on top of their heads (hence the name). The family includes about 51 species found worldwide in shallow and deep saltwaters. They can make their eyes protrude to give a wider field of vision and their large, upward-facing mouth is fringed to keep sand out. They usually bury themselves in sand, leaping upwards with lightening speed to grasp prey in its large mouth, swallowing them whole. Stargazers are venomous; they have two large venomous spines situated behind their opercules and above their pectoral fins. Lengths range from 18 up to 90 cm, for the Giant Stargazer,  Kathetostoma giganteum.

Accidentally treading on any venomous fish will cause a very painful injury. Treat wounds immediately by washing with cold salt water then soaking in hot water for 30 to 90 minutes. The water should be as hot as can be tolerated to break down the venom. After those steps, visit the doctor for some anti-venom.

Artist’s Open House Exhibition 2019

underwater flower photo

 

Artist’s Open House Exhibition 2019

Colleen will be showing her work at ʻIlana Richardson and Guestsʼ which is venue 4 on the West Hove Trail.

66 Langdale Gardens, Hove, BN3 4HH
Tel: 01273 726 464
email art@ilana-richardson.com

Link to house: https://aoh.org.uk/house/may2019/ilana-richardson-guests-4/

Open every Saturday and Sunday in May from 11 am – 5 pm

Colleen Slater Photography

Ilana Richardson Paintings and prints Photography
Joanna Osborne Ceramic dogs
Annette Street Silver jewellery
Nick Orsborn Cicada jewellery
Orna Scheerson-Pascal Cushions
Shefton Kaplan Domestic pottery

West Hove Art Trail

Tides Exhibition – Preview

Saturday 6 October from 4pm to 6pm on the beach – all welcome.

As part of the Brighton Photo Fringe held during the Photo Biennial, my work will be shown in the Tides group exhibition ‘Port Life.’ As previously, it will be taking place on Brighton Beach itself, opposite the Brighton Centre and close to the British Airways i360.  The postcode nearest to the beach location is BN1 2GR. The exhibition runs from Saturday 29 September for the whole month.

In 2016, we showed images made in the area of Brighton between the piers. For our latest project, the seven of us turned our attention to the coastal strip from ‘Millionaires Row’ along to the Shoreham harbour wall.

SEA OF DREAMS #4

SEA OF DREAMS #4

Prints are available to purchase on request :

www.colleenslaterphotography.co.uk
email: info@colleenslaterphotography.co.uk

Brighton Photo Fringe

Brighton PhotoFringe – Tides Exhibition

I will be showing work in the TIDES group’s ‘Port Life’ exhibition which is part of the PhotoFringe held during the Photo Biennial this October. The images will be shown on gabions on Brighton beach in front of the Grand Hotel.

Following on from our PhotoFringe exhibition in 2016, when we photographed the area between the piers, we’ve moved on down the coast. Seven of us collaborated on a project to photograph the two-mile coastal strip from ‘Millionaires Row’ along to the Shoreham harbour wall.

The area has a peculiar atmosphere which fascinates me and which is very different from Brighton between the piers. My images are a response to the strangeness I find in this place.

SEA OF DREAMS #4

SEA OF DREAMS #4

SEA OF DREAMS #5

SEA OF DREAMS #5

Brighton Photo Fringe

Amateur Photographer Magazine

Amateur Photographer magazine’s 24 March edition is a macro special.  I was pleased to be invited to write and illustrate a four-page feature on macro lighting for this issue. Articles by Ross Hoddinott, Sue Bishop and Sandra Bartocha, among others, are also featured.

Screen Shot 2018-03-29 at 12.15.25

Amateur Photographer magazine

Urban Surfaces – Beneath the Looking Glass II

Beneath the Looking Glass

Another group of images from the phone box project. Bits of detritus including seeds, feathers and hairs, become attached to the remains of sticky tape on the surface of the glass. Random specks of dirt sparkle like jewels as they catch the light.

Beneath the Looking Glass

Urban Surfaces – Beneath the Looking Glass

Beneath the Looking Glass

You might not consider a phone box a likely subject for photography. Phone boxes are now, for the most part, obsolete – dirty, uncared-for pieces of street furniture, a receptacle for rubbish, covered with graffiti and the remains of advertising flyers.

Close-up shots of the surface of the glass using a macro lens, conceal the context of the subject matter and reveal a world of colours, forms, textures and mysterious patterns.

Beneath the Looking Glass

 

Beneath the Looking Glass

Artist’s Open House 2017 – Seven Dials Trail

 Art at No.51

 

BRIGHTON PAVILION, DR. BLIGHTY #14

51 Montefiore Road Hove BN3 6EP
Tel: 01273 770947
email montefioreno51@gmail.com

Link to house: http://aoh.org.uk/house/no-51/

Open every Saturday and Sunday in May from 11 am – 5 pm

Colleen Slater Photography

Rosie Clayden Jewellery
Chris Durham Photography
Keziah Furini Digital art
Rachel Lemon Drawings and ceramics
Miles Whitaker-Durham Paintings

We look forward to welcoming you with a diverse selection of contemporary art and delicious cake.

sevendialsmap2017